Category: Poets & Writers

“I share this honor with ancestors and teacher…

“I share this honor with ancestors and teachers who inspired in me a love of poetry, who taught that words are powerful and can make change when understanding appears impossible, and how time and timelessness can live together within a poem.” —Joy Harjo, first Native American poet to serve as U.S. poet laureate

Photo: Shawn Miller/Library of Congress

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“I had no idea what I was doing most of the ti…

“I had no idea what I was doing most of the time I was writing this book. I’m frankly shocked that I managed to write a book with ‘propulsive tension.’ It definitely didn’t come easily. Most of what I write starts with a premise. I love a strange or unsettling premise, love the words what if.”

Miciah Bay Gault, on her debut novel, Goodnight Stranger, featured in “First Fiction 2019″ in the July/August issue of Poets & Writers Magazine

“I don’t see myself as a success story even th…

“I don’t see myself as a success story even though I’ve experienced success. Everything I learned along the way was a strength. If I didn’t have my communities, that many consider broken or forgotten, I wouldn’t be where I am. I don’t want to be a sob story or anybody’s project. I want to show that you can have pride no matter where you come from and joy without forsaking the pain it took to get here.”

Ocean Vuong, in a profile by Rigoberto González in the July/August issue of Poets & Writers Magazine (2019)

I had a blast writing the first draft…a…

I had a blast writing the first draft…and just let myself take risks and go down rabbit holes, but in the revision, I had to really reign it in and flesh it out….Write the shitty first draft. A finished story is better than a perfect story that just lives in your mind.

Something that keeps me going when I get stuck…

Something that keeps me going when I get stuck in my writing is getting the hell out of the house. I take walks, very late at night, around the lake that sits nearby. It’s quiet—just me and all the nocturnal animals, many mosquitoes, and my sweaty beer—and I’ll stroll and listen to the cicadas shriek. It’s good to look around at all that expansive beauty and wonder about the largeness of the planet: I’m such a small thing, just one of many creatures.

I try to write every day. If that isn’t possib…

I try to write every day. If that isn’t possible—since we’re human and we need breathers—I read, watch television, and spend time with my loved ones. I find that the majority of my inspiration comes from just living my life, so I take my non-writing time as seriously as I do my writing.

Knowing that writing is a process more than it…

Knowing that writing is a process more than it is talent eases most of my anxieties when the words just aren’t there. Baldwin once said, ‘Talent is insignificant. I know a lot of talented ruins. Beyond talent lie all the usual words: discipline, love, luck, but most of all, endurance.’ Because of this, I keep going back to the blank pages.

Anne Lamott said something along the lines of …

Anne Lamott said something along the lines of ‘write a shitty first draft.’ This is the only way I can summon the courage to write anything. I am human and flawed and this is never more evident than when I see it spelled out in my words on a screen or a sheet of paper. But as bad as that first draft may be—and sometimes it’s not as bad as my first impression of it is—I have a chance to make it better one day at a time. That is the craft. That is what makes a writer: the willingness to rewrite a thousand times if necessary.

As someone who has spent more of my life cooki…

As someone who has spent more of my life cooking food than writing poems, I have an intimate relationship to material; how things feel in my hand and in my mouth. Faced with an empty page, sometimes I need to leave words, get up, go outside, and get my hands dirty. But if words help, here are some the poet Dean Young wrote….‘You can’t sustain inspiration, you can only court it, and here’s the thing: it happens WHILE you work. It’s not something to wait around for. You have to sweep the temple steps a lot in hopes that the god appears.‘

When working on a novel, I write every day, 8:…

When working on a novel, I write every day, 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM, following very strict routines: starting and finishing at the same time, and aiming to get a certain quota of work done. Over time I’ve developed a Pavlovian response to my rituals: When I take the first sip of coffee at 8:00 AM, my brain flips a switch and I’m in writing mode.